(Al & Kose) are dedicated to bringing you the freshest in indie hip-hop & urban culture.

VISUAL - “Watch What The Devil Gets”

One of the hardest working guys in Chicago Hip Hop and Hip Hop as a whole, Visual(who also once let yours truly sleep on his futon for a few months back in the day when I had no place to stay) drops some knowledge and wisdom on us fools!!

off Supreme Science on iTunes now
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/sup…

VISUAL - Watch what the devil gets (official video)

Produced by @LooseCannon773
Shot by @Mr2Canons

Google search or search wherever you download or stream music : VISUAL - Supreme Science

Iseeitall.com
Instagram @ Iseeitall
Twitter @Iseeitall
Facebook/Iseeitall

(Source: youtube.com)

Azizi Gibson - “The Statement”

From the BACKWARD BOOKS” EP
http://www.mediafire.com/download/htm3ah7bxodx942/Azizi+Gibson+Backward+Books+EP.zip

PreHistoric Crew presents
The Statement - Azizi Gibson
Producer: Millz
Director & Editor: Ric Grimes
Sound Engineer: Laurence Naber

BACKWARD BOOKS COMING JULY 1, 2014!

Follow the crew!
@AziziGibson
@MillzDxuglas
@ricgrimes_
@AzerPHC
@KCB_LA
@MIHEntGroup

(Source: youtube.com)

Azizi Gibson - “Backward Books” (EP)

preHISTORIC presents Azizi Gibson’s “Backward Books” EP


Brainfeeder Records.


DOWNLOAD BACKWARD BOOKS - https://www.mediafire.com/?htm3ah7bxodx942


https://twitter.com/azizigibson
http://instagram.com/azizigibsonph
http://facebook.com/prehistoriccrew

King Lil G - “Hopeless Boy” (ft. David Ortiz)

Music Video Directed By Ben Griffin

DOWNLOAD THE MIXTAPE NOW - http://msclvr.co/9LILG_AK47Boyz

Listen on SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/kinglilg

DOWNLOAD HERE FOR FREE Link Below
http://www.datpiff.com/King-Lil-G-Los…

https://kinglilg.com
https://twitter.com/kinglilg
http://www.facebook.com/tattood.gunz
http://instagram.com/king_lilg

Lost in Smoke, King Enemy, & Blue Devil 2 albums available on iTunes and at Best Buy, FYE & Mom & Pops Shops NOW!!

http://msclvr.co/9LILG_LostInSmoke

http://msclvr.co/9LILG_KINGENEMY

http://msclvr.co/9LILG_BlueDevil2

©2014 AK47Boyz/MIH Entertainment, LLC

(Source: youtube.com)

Prison Rap - Round 3 - Old Me

New Prison Artists trying to express themselves from behind the bars. SHOW SOME LOVE! SHARE!

Not really sure how they got cameras and Youtube in prison, but either way…this actually sounds pretty damn good!

(Source: youtube.com)

Mayalino - “Keep Beggin”

Music Visual by Mayalino performing “Keep Beggin” for the 30 Shot Glock Boyz tape. 2014 produced by DJ Space City. Music Video Directed and Edited by Matt Lopez of Last Castle Media

Audio:
https://soundcloud.com/hip-hop/mayalino-keep-beggin

Instagram:
@mayalinograms
@lastcastlemedia
@djspacecity

https://twitter.com/mayalinograms
https://twitter.com/DJSpaceCity
https://www.youtube.com/user/LastCastleMedia
https://www.facebook.com/lastcastlemediavideoandphotography
http://www.lastcastlemedia.net/

A-Villa: “The Warrior, The Philosopher, & The Rebel” (feat. Lil Fame, Cormega, & Killer Mike)

Mixed by Greg “G-Ball” Magers & A-Villa at The Attic and Mastered by Mike Kolar at Soundscape Studios.

From the forthcoming LP, Carry On Tradition from Chicago-based producer, A-Villa. Carry On Tradition will be released 9/23 via Closed Sessions and features appearances by: Big K.R.I.T., Action Bronson, Kool G Rap, Joell Ortiz, Freeway, Michael Christmas, Roc Marciano, N.O.R.E., Macie Stewart, AZ, Havoc, Freddie Gibbs, Tree, and many more.



For inquiries: Alex@ClosedSessions.com.

https://www.twitter.com/closedsessions

Mass Hysteria - “Hands Up High (ft. Rhymefest)

**This is a track we posted last year, but we lost a lot of posts after we made the transition from Blogspot to Tumblr**

The BANGIN’ New single off MASS HYSTERIA’s upcoming album! (Spring, 2013)
Produced By @PhilGates1976 and Co-Produced and mixed by Mike Treese and @KeithKruz
Written by Mike Treese, Gee-Field, and

@Rhymefest

Cover by www.NicoBerry.com

https://twitter.com/mhhiphop

https://twitter.com/RHYMEFEST

Destiny Official Beta Trailer

The Destiny Beta is your first step on the path to adventure, beginning July 17th on PlayStation and July 23rd on Xbox. Explore the vast expanses of the world of Destiny, fight through riveting story missions, strike deep within enemy strongholds alongside a fireteam, or compete for glory against your fellow Guardians in the action-packed competitive multiplayer.

Keep up with all of the latest information by following us on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/destinythegame

Twitter:
@DestinytheGame
@Bungie).

Visit www.destinythegame.com or www.bungie.net to learn more.

(Source: youtube.com)

'Purple Rain' Director Albert Magnoli Looks Back on Film's 30th Anniversary

Three decades ago, rookie director Albert Magnoli, fresh out of USC film school, unknowingly embarked on a cinematic journey that would change the lives of everyone involved and make concert film history.

After a fateful meeting with a rising musician who was petite in stature but a giant in his abilities, Magnoli took on an indie film project that would later become one of the most well-known rock movies of all time, Purple Rain. Its star, Prince, would go on to become one of the most acclaimed recording artists of his generation.

We caught up with the director on the 30th anniversary of Purple Rain’s cinematic release to find out how it all went down, circa 1984, in Prince’s hometown of Minneapolis.

Magnoli recalls that when he and Prince met for the first time, they had an instant connection. “That night, I pitched to him my idea of what the film could be,” Magnoli explains. “He liked it very much. He said, ‘How is it possible within 10 minutes of us being together you can tell my life story?’” Needless to say, Magnoli got the job, and Prince gave him a whopping 100 original tracks to listen to in order to select a handful that would appear in the film, which was not yet titled.

"The music had to inform the content and themes of the film," Magnoli explains. "Both things had to work in conjunction with each other. I wanted to avoid ‘let’s hear some music and get back to the story.’"

Magnoli narrowed down the 100 tracks down to the 12 that would appear in the film. Interestingly, “Purple Rain” was not among the songs Prince initially gave him.

"We were always looking for the big anthem where [Prince] got onstage and essentially confessed his sins," Magnoli says. "Later he was playing at the First Avenue bar [in Minneapolis] with his band, which is where we shot the movie. He liked trying out new songs in front of a home audience. That’s were he tried out ‘Purple Rain.’ But it wasn’t called ‘Purple Rain’ at that time. It had no title. I said, ‘I like that song,’ and he said he was thinking of calling it ‘Purple Rain.’" Prince then asked Magnoli if they could title the film Purple Rain, and Magnoli agreed.

Magnoli and screenwriter William Blinn penned the film, which was about a Minneapolis musician who used music to escape his troubled home life and abusive father. Prince starred in the title role, and it also featured his real-life band, the Revolution, along with Apollonia Kotero and the Time’s Morris Day.

As Magnoli tells it, nobody had any idea Purple Rain would become so successful and spawn a soundtrack that would go on to become one of the biggest rock albums of all time, claiming the top spot on the Billboard charts for a record-breaking 24 weeks in 1984 and 1985.

"Thirty years ago, we didn’t know we were making a major motion picture," says Magnoli. "And working with Prince wasn’t working with the Prince who became the worldwide star he became after the movie… he was still considered by most people as a fringe artist. So we went into the film believing we were making a fringe movie."

They had a modest budget of a million dollars to make the film, which was very little even by 1984’s standards. Then Warner Bros. came on board and kicked in an additional $7 million during preproduction, which still was not a lot in terms of movie-making.

"When the film was done, Warner Bros. still didn’t know what they had," Magnoli says. "They screened it for audience feedback at the Warner lot [in Los Angeles], in San Diego, and in Colorado. All three screenings were essentially comprised of white audiences, and the response was quite strong. Then Warner Bros. realized that indeed I made something that could cross over."

Purple Rain ended up grossing more than $80 million at the box office and became a classic.

So what was it like working with the Purple One and the Revolution? “I always felt they had a very strong work ethic, and were very disciplined,” Magnoli says. “It was just a matter of bringing them from the music world into the film world. In music. you’re working at night and sleeping during the day. In the movie world… you work 14-hour days that start at 6 in the morning. But working with them was a delight. They responded as professionals and never arrived on set late.”

Their strong work ethic paid off, and Purple Rain catapulted Prince to becoming the major superstar he is today — still going strong after more than three decades.

'Purple Rain' Director Albert Magnoli Looks Back on Film's 30th Anniversary

Three decades ago, rookie director Albert Magnoli, fresh out of USC film school, unknowingly embarked on a cinematic journey that would change the lives of everyone involved and make concert film history.

After a fateful meeting with a rising musician who was petite in stature but a giant in his abilities, Magnoli took on an indie film project that would later become one of the most well-known rock movies of all time, Purple Rain. Its star, Prince, would go on to become one of the most acclaimed recording artists of his generation.

We caught up with the director on the 30th anniversary of Purple Rain’s cinematic release to find out how it all went down, circa 1984, in Prince’s hometown of Minneapolis.

Magnoli recalls that when he and Prince met for the first time, they had an instant connection. “That night, I pitched to him my idea of what the film could be,” Magnoli explains. “He liked it very much. He said, ‘How is it possible within 10 minutes of us being together you can tell my life story?’” Needless to say, Magnoli got the job, and Prince gave him a whopping 100 original tracks to listen to in order to select a handful that would appear in the film, which was not yet titled.

"The music had to inform the content and themes of the film," Magnoli explains. "Both things had to work in conjunction with each other. I wanted to avoid ‘let’s hear some music and get back to the story.’"

Magnoli narrowed down the 100 tracks down to the 12 that would appear in the film. Interestingly, “Purple Rain” was not among the songs Prince initially gave him.

"We were always looking for the big anthem where [Prince] got onstage and essentially confessed his sins," Magnoli says. "Later he was playing at the First Avenue bar [in Minneapolis] with his band, which is where we shot the movie. He liked trying out new songs in front of a home audience. That’s were he tried out ‘Purple Rain.’ But it wasn’t called ‘Purple Rain’ at that time. It had no title. I said, ‘I like that song,’ and he said he was thinking of calling it ‘Purple Rain.’" Prince then asked Magnoli if they could title the film Purple Rain, and Magnoli agreed.

Magnoli and screenwriter William Blinn penned the film, which was about a Minneapolis musician who used music to escape his troubled home life and abusive father. Prince starred in the title role, and it also featured his real-life band, the Revolution, along with Apollonia Kotero and the Time’s Morris Day.

As Magnoli tells it, nobody had any idea Purple Rain would become so successful and spawn a soundtrack that would go on to become one of the biggest rock albums of all time, claiming the top spot on the Billboard charts for a record-breaking 24 weeks in 1984 and 1985.

"Thirty years ago, we didn’t know we were making a major motion picture," says Magnoli. "And working with Prince wasn’t working with the Prince who became the worldwide star he became after the movie… he was still considered by most people as a fringe artist. So we went into the film believing we were making a fringe movie."

They had a modest budget of a million dollars to make the film, which was very little even by 1984’s standards. Then Warner Bros. came on board and kicked in an additional $7 million during preproduction, which still was not a lot in terms of movie-making.

"When the film was done, Warner Bros. still didn’t know what they had," Magnoli says. "They screened it for audience feedback at the Warner lot [in Los Angeles], in San Diego, and in Colorado. All three screenings were essentially comprised of white audiences, and the response was quite strong. Then Warner Bros. realized that indeed I made something that could cross over."

Purple Rain ended up grossing more than $80 million at the box office and became a classic.

So what was it like working with the Purple One and the Revolution? “I always felt they had a very strong work ethic, and were very disciplined,” Magnoli says. “It was just a matter of bringing them from the music world into the film world. In music. you’re working at night and sleeping during the day. In the movie world… you work 14-hour days that start at 6 in the morning. But working with them was a delight. They responded as professionals and never arrived on set late.”

Their strong work ethic paid off, and Purple Rain catapulted Prince to becoming the major superstar he is today — still going strong after more than three decades.